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Jackie Tann

DR MINDY SIMPSON – The psychology of Sport and how to achieve your best and manage the lows

By | Podcast

Transcript

00:14
Today on the show, I chat with performance psychologist Dr. Mindy Simpson, having represented Australia in indoor hockey and enjoying a career as a high performance athlete. Mindy has unique insights into the demands of elite sport and the immense pressure to perform. She’s represented Australia and Victoria for many years competing at the inaugural indoor hockey World Cup in Germany in 2003. Her experiences help her understand the high performance environment of an elite athlete, she knows firsthand the pressures they face to perform. I had so much fun chatting with Mindy, and there are so many tips and ways that you can manage your performance and get the best out of your abilities. The great thing about this episode is that it is not exclusive to athletes. Anyone who’s looking to get the most out of themselves, whether it be performing at your best at work, on the stage, flying your jet, whatever it is, when you need high performance training, this is a really, really awesome place to start. So enjoy this episode with Dr. Mindy Simpson.

02:10
Mindy, thank you so much for chatting with me today. I’m super excited to get into this sport psychologies, incredibly interesting to me. I’ve worked with I work with a lot of different athletes. And we know that, you know, mindset plays a big role in, in performance and how we train. But it really it really goes deeper than that. So I’m excited to explore that with you today. But before we get into it, can you give us some background on your sports or sporting career and how you eventually came to be a sports psychologist?

02:47
Sure. Thank you very much for having me, Jackie. So I grew up in Melbourne and I lived there for most of my life. And when I was younger, I played lots of different sports growing up, tennis, gymnastics, I was actually quite a good youth sailor, swimming and diving and cricket. And I loved to play footy as well in the back garden. There was no pathway back then for females playing footy, unfortunately. But I still love the sport. And then I started playing hockey at the age of 30, which is quite late compared to kids today who are now starting at four or five years old. And I love the sport so much that I just spent all day Saturday at the Hockey Club playing juniors in the morning and seniors in the afternoon. It was so much fun. And I also played indoor hockey, which is a different type of hockey. It’s really fun, and it’s fast, and it’s skillful. And it’s exciting. And it’s played with five players on the field and a goalkeeper on a court about the size of a basketball court. And it has moderated hockey rules. And I made my first state team at under 21 level for outdoor hockey for Victoria.

04:01
And then I went on to play senior hockey as well for Victoria for a few years. And during this time, I really started to love indoor hockey and do well at it. And I played for 15 years in the Victorian senior State team competing in national championships all over Australia. I don’t think that there’s a state that I haven’t played in. And I love the experience of travelling with the team. We always had great team bonding. And you know, we were quite successful over those years. And then in 1995, I played a season of hockey in Germany, in Hamburg, which was an amazing experience and I’m still really good friends with some of my teammates that I made from there. And I made my debut for the Australian indoor hockey team. I think it was 1997 and we toured New Zealand. And then I remained in that team for nine years and the highlight really was playing in the first ever indoor hockey World Cup in Leipzig, Germany in 2003. That was a really amazing experience.

05:02
And then if we talk about the psychology side, straight from school, I went to Melbourne University and completed an arts degree majoring in psychology. And I’ve always been interested in psychology. And I wanted to study sport psychology, but there weren’t many options back then. And I didn’t think that there would be many opportunities for jobs either because it was kind of really at the beginning of sports psychology. So I actually went on to have a 17 year career in market research, which also allowed me to travel and compete in hockey during that time. And then I met my husband through a mutual hockey friend and he was based in Perth. So I moved over here and continued to work in market research. But I’d always wanted to go back and finish my psychology qualifications. So you need to do six years of study to become a registered psychologist. So while I worked here in Perth, I completed that and then a further two years of supervised practice to become an endorsed organisational psychologist. And I was still keen to work in sports performance psychology to combine You know, my experience as an athlete and my passion for supporting athletes and coaches and teams, you know, to help them reach their full potential through their practice of performance psychology. So I started my own business, called I thrive consulting about four and a half years ago. And I’ve also been consulting to a company called Condor performance for the last 18 months.

06:37
And now 50% of my work is in organisations, so running leadership programmes, team building sessions, delivering workshops on resilience, and emotional intelligence and coaching executives.

06:51
And the other 50% of my work is with AFL players, athletes from a variety of other sports coaches, teams, and also non sporting performance, such as doctors, studying for their specialist exams, stage performers, and pilots. And I work with people of all ages and all levels. So I think that the youngest client I’ve ever had was 11 years old. And the oldest client I’ve had is was a basketball referee in his 60s. So I really love working with different types and variety of people. And the other thing I love doing is developing young female leaders and I have created a lot of programmes around leadership within sport, and work with the AFL programme here, and basketball and cricket in that area.

07:43
And I also believe in giving back to my sport, which has given so much to me over the years. So I’ve been coaching hockey for a very long time, at all different ages, but particularly focused at the junior level, because my husband and I currently coach my son who plays and he’s 12 years old.

08:01
Amazing.

08:02
So yeah, it’s quite a varied history. Yeah. And they do say that, you know, people change careers a lot. Throughout the years, these days. I think the average is around five career changes. Is it? Yeah, something like that.

08:20
Wow. Hmm.

08:23
I, let’s go back a bit, because you mentioned your youngest is 11. the youngest that you have worked with.

08:38
Yeah. 11 years old. Yeah.

08:39
And then the oldest, did you say 63? In his 60s? Yeah. So I mean, that’s a huge contrast. Do you find it easier working with that young athlete because they’re yet to kind of develop certain habits or mindsets? Or do you find it easy to work with that older person who? I don’t know, who is obviously is there, he’s seeing you for a reason. He knows that something needs to change, obviously.

09:16
Yes. So, like, I have three different types of clients. So the first type are clients that come to you that actually have an issue. So a barrier that they need to need help to remove in order for them to perform at their best. The second type is people who are already performing well but want to take their performances to the next level. And the third type are those who have who are struggling with mental health issues. So you know, either depression or anxiety, and that is impacting them as a person in general. And the younger sports, or the younger athletes come to me and and they’re just learning, you know, they’re just learning the mental skills and they concepts that are going to help them perform, I think the best age for juniors to start working with a sports psychologist or performance psychologist is around 13 years old, because they’re old enough then to kind of get it and take onboard the concepts. And they probably are the most likely to be at the level where they’re doing really well in their sport, and they really want to take it to the next level. And they just don’t know how to develop those mental skills that are going to get them there. Yeah, the app, on the other hand, working with adults, you know, I really love working with adults as well, because they get it a lot more quickly than what kids do. But you can break it down for children, you know, all the mental skills and content, you can break it down to kind of smaller steps in order to move them forward. But once they get it, you know, they can take it on board and really run with it.

10:59
What do you love about this work?

11:02
Well, I’m really interested in human behaviour and kind of what drives and motivates people to be the best that they can be. And I’m really passionate about working together with my clients to reach their potential and achieve, you know, all they want in not just in sport, but in their work life and in their life in general. And so the focus for me is really about the whole person, I take a holistic approach. And it’s not just about you, as an athlete, or you as a performer. And often I think the psychology side of performance is missed. And you know, individuals and coaches haven’t really learned the mental skills that can take their performance to the next level. And the other thing I love about this work is just the variety. I mean, you know, on one day, I could be running a session with 22, seven year old soccer players about creating a positive team environment, I could be coaching a managing director at a law firm, working with a doctor who’s stressed about their upcoming exams, seeing a client with anxiety, and then in the evening running a leadership programme for young AFL women. So that’s really, you know, I love to be doing all sorts of different things. So it’s fantastic to be able to have that variety in my work.


Listen to the full episode on your favourite app…

Where to find Mindy

Website: www.condorperformance.com

Website: www.ithriveconsulting.com.au

Facebook: @condorperformance

Instagram: @condorperformance

Get In touch:

[email protected]

Instagram: @jackietann_rmt

CHRIS TAYLOR – How do you start running? Remove all barriers of course…

By | Podcast

Transcript:

00:14
Today on the show, I’m chatting with my good friend and go to person for all my running advice. Chris Taylor. Chris has been running for almost 13 years, and ran his best times in his early 50s. Yes, you heard correct, with the best times of two hours 42 for a marathon and one hour 16 and a half marathon. And did I mentioned that was in his early 50s. Chris has been coaching runners for the last 10 years. And in 2015, he started his own running club, running domain, a friendly and inclusive club that caters to runners of all speeds and abilities. Chris is an open book, and his enthusiasm for running and helping others to run and achieve their goals is evident in the way he runs his club. And in the community he has built, we talk about running through your ladies in life, how to start running, how to get back into running, we cover technique, we cover motivation, and the little voice in your head that may tell you not to run, how to overcome all that, how to get faster, and how to build your engine. I love it all. He was fantastic. I know you’ll enjoy this episode. Check it out with Chris Taylor.

02:13
Chris, thank you so much for chatting with me today. We have known each other since 2016. Now and you’ve pretty much been my go to running expert, you’ve helped me with my running and become more efficient. But before we get into all that running goodness, I’d love to know a bit more about you and your background because I know you got into running a little later on in life.

02:40
So I got into running later in life when I migrated to Australia, hadn’t really done any exercise since I left school pretty much. And I came to Australia and I was working in it at the time. And I found myself just working with some people who did a bit of recreational running. And they did the corporate cup. So I tagged along and was part of that team. So we did a few training sessions. And because I hadn’t done anything for so many years, I was pretty rubbish. And then I got a little bit better, did the City to Bay did a couple of half marathons early on. And I just enjoyed running so I kept running just as a recreational runner. It’s just something I enjoyed doing. It was something for me something for myself, that I could just go out and do and as a bit of a distraction from you know, life, the world and everything and and something that I just enjoy doing just gave me kind of a good feeling. So that’s why I got into running. And that’s why I stayed running.

03:41
I really like how you said that you are rubbish at first. When you feel rubbish, how do you keep going? What do you tell yourself to go to go through that again?

03:56
Well, I don’t know. I mean, I figured that everyone else could run so I could run. It was just that I hadn’t done it for such a long time that I just needed to kind of dig in a little bit and make it happen and found that other people could do it and I couldn’t. It’s just really me being unfit. And I think, you know, when you’re in your early 30s and you’re unfit, you know, it’s, you realise that something’s a little bit wrong. And so I just kind of persisted with it. And having persisted with it, I realised that I was actually not too bad at it. It’s just kind of getting over that hump. And I think that’s what a lot of people, you know, when they start running, that’s, that’s one of the things you think, you know, you see other people running and you think oh that looks so lovely, it’s so easy and, and it was the same for me, I’d have people around me who were really quite good runners, and I started and I was hopeless, and I look, you know, physically not that different from it wasn’t like I was carrying a lot of weight or I was, you know, had one leg or anything I was I was kind of well equipped to run I just couldn’t so yeah, it’s It was just a matter of digging in. And once you dig in and get through that hump, then then you’re okay. And it’s, you know, it’s that you have to be a little bit patient. I think that’s probably one of the things that we’ll talk about a little bit further on today. In this is, is patience and not wanting too much too soon. And, and being a little bit kind to yourself.

05:24
Yeah, huge. When did you realise you were good at it?

05:30
Not for quite some time I like so I started running a long, long time ago, probably 30 years ago. And I ran on and off mostly on my own. And I was never really brave enough to join up with a group because I never thought I was good enough. And I was never really that organised either. And I’ve never really been one for team sports, I was never really one to kind of hang out with other people or need other people I was quite solitary in that, which again, I think is fairly typical, from a lot of runners, I was hopeless at sports at school, you know, just wasn’t really wasn’t at school teams for anything. Basically, I was quite good at running, and which I just enjoy doing for myself. So it was probably only when I joined a running group and found myself amongst a group of other people who were of similar capability. And then you start running together, and you start challenging each other by getting a good cohort of other people. But it was only it’s only when you you know, when you’ve got when you’re running on your own, you got nothing to measure by. And I was doing a few events. I did, you know, half marathon fairly early on in the pace, probably after two or three months of starting running. I did. Wow. Which was actually good. It took me like 10 years to beat that time. Like it was just a bit of a fluke, I think,

06:55
wait a minute, what do you what do you mean by it took you 10 years to beat that time?

06:58
Well, I think I think I did about a 90 minute half marathon, I never got under 90 minutes for a nother 10 years, I didn’t do that many half marathons, I did do a few through that period, probably not five or six, but it took me quite a long time to actually improve on that time. So kind of set the bar high straightaway and then couldn’t beat it. But so I realised when I was doing that I was okay. But there were a whole lot of people who are a whole lot better than me, like, you know, you see the people at the front and you think they’re gods, you know, like, how can they run those times? You know, and you’re just a hacker in kinda in the middle of the pack. And, but I enjoy doing them. I enjoyed the events, and I enjoyed the atmosphere and being around people in there. So and it does give you a bit of a measure. I mean, it’s one of the things I guess with, with COVID. At the moment, when the lack of events, it’s hard to keep the measure on yourself. But back then, when the back in the day before COVID, when there were events, it’s it’s, you know, it was one of the ways that you kind of know where you are in the scheme of things.

08:00
Yeah, you’ve said that your best running times have come in your 50s. Yeah, and your best marathon times at 2hours 42.

08:15
Yeah, ran that somewhere around there..

Listen to the full episode on your favourite app…

Where to find Chris:

Website : www.runnningdomain.com.au

Instagram: @runningdomain

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/adelaiderunningdomain

Get in touch:

[email protected]

instagram: @jackietann_rmt

ANGE FOSTER – How Heart Failure gave Ange a new lease on life … and a side hustle that supporting small businesses

By | Podcast

Transcript:

00:11
Hey, hey, this is Jackie Tann, and welcome to the body’s built better podcast. On the show, we chat with experts, athletes, coaches and authors to educate and inspire you. We explore the body’s incredible ability to heal, adapt, and evolve so you could crush limitations reconnects your body and mind and discover your extraordinary potential.

00:44
Today on the show, I chat with Kaylee, entrepreneur Ange Foster. I learned of Angela’s story this year at the start of the COVID restrictions around Australia. And if you met her at a gathering or bumped into her on the street, you’d never know that she has to take medication to keep her heart, doing its job. diagnosed with heart failure back in 2017, gave her a renewed outlook on life. She started a premium gift box business that helps other businesses showcase their products and get their name out to the public. She volunteers as a committee member on the heart Foundation’s supporting young hearts programme. And she has a full time job. Her story is so important. And she wants everyone to know that no matter what you’re dealing with, there is help and support for you. You are not alone. Be inspired by this incredible woman, Ange Foster. Ange thank you so much for chatting with me today.

01:53
What people don’t know is that we only met e-met cyber met, whatever you want to say it, this year in the beginning of the year, because we both own a business. And we were looking to collaborate. And then COVID hit and I remember talking with you, and it was the time where I had just closed down or shut down my business temporarily. And and it was through that, that I began to learn your story. And more importantly, your health challenges, which is one of those things when you’re in a situation And you know, I remember thinking back then, and in my situation, I’d close down the business and I was pretty distraught. After talking with you, I’m like, well, holy shit. I mean, I’ve got my health I’m, I’m pretty good, like otherwise. And so I guess what I’m trying to say is, you’re an inspiration to me. And I think your story is a really important one to tell. So thank you for for sharing it with us today.

03:14
So let’s kick this off. Can you give our audience or the audience a bit of background on you?

03:23
Sure. Well, firstly, thanks for having me on Jackie. I think it’s really important as part of my house journey, to hear from others and connect with others. So that’s why I’m so passionate about sharing my story. I guess it’s not so people, can have that oh shit moment where they go, Oh, poor Ange, I have had to deal with a lot. But you know, I share my story because I hope that it inspires others to face life head on, no matter what’s thrown their way. And we all have different curveballs thrown at us. And I reflect on when we met and hearing your story and the challenges that you were going through, particularly because we’re in different states. I’m in you know, Victoria here in Melbourne, you’re in South Australia. So it was really interesting to hear, from your perspective, what was happening in your world.

04:15
You know, I guess in terms of my health journey, it’s really been, gosh, I guess, over 10 years that I’ve been experiencing challenges with my health. So really, things sort of started to feel a lot better. I you know, I wasn’t on top of my health too much in my late 20s and right through to my late 30s. I’m now in my 40s but um, I guess it’s just been a really long road over those 10 years of discovering how to listen to my body and seeking help and making sure that I kep t going until I received diagnoses and was able to pinpoint what’s going on.

05:01
So yeah, over the last decade, I’ve had a lot to deal with, I have now three chronic health conditions. The first one I was diagnosed with, in my late 20s was hashimotos disease. So that’s an autoimmune disorder that affects your thyroid.Specifically, basically, your body attacks your thyroid, so it stops working. So it’s similar to how some people have type one diabetes, that’s also an autoimmune disorder where the pancreas stops producing insulin. So for me with the thyroid, basically, it stopped producing the hormones my body needed to operate and, and run itself, essentially.And the second diagnosis, I received the following that so about three or four years after that diagnosis, I was still feeling quite rundown and fatigued.And I had had a lot to deal with in my personal life as well.

06:04
And I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia, which is a really tricky kind of, I guess, condition. But mainly it’s fatigue and lack of being able to sleep for me that I found, and particularly a lot of pain and my muscles and bones and joints. So the way that that was diagnosed was basically a process of elimination. And there is no test definitive tests that you can really do for fibromyalgia, but I had sleep studies and blood tests, and I saw, you know, lots of specialists and spoke to my GP, and essentially, based on ruling out anything else and seeing a rheumatologist. to diagnose certain trigger points in my body, I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia and both of those conditions are treated with medication and lifestyle change. So I was going along pretty pretty well, all things considered. After that I had learned a lot about my body and how to look after myself. And, you know, in regular contact with my GP and my medical team, I guess, different specialists. And then the biggest surprise of all was when I was diagnosed with heart failure.

07:22
And that happened about actually, nearly three years ago to the day I was diagnosed, with heart failure, severe heart failure. So I was in hospital for a couple of weeks. Until all the tests around and like and the the team could figure out what’s going on. So that’s been my, my significant health curveball, I think so, you know, a lot has happened in the past three years as well.

07:53
That’s, that’s Yeah, past three years and decade. But some, you know, it is it is part of who I am. But obviously, it doesn’t define who I am. And I think that’s a really important point that, you know, I do have challenges like everyone.

08:12
And those, I guess, the more formal health diagnosis I’ve received over the last 10 years. But also with that comes challenges with mental health, challenges with navigating the world around me my career, my family life.

Where to Find Ange:

Website: www.thelittlegiftloft.com.au

Instagram: @thelittlegiftloft

More on Ange : https://www.heartfoundation.org.au/blog/Cardiomyopathy-another-health-curveball-for-Ange

DISCOUNT CODE: Type LGL10 at The Little Gift Loft checkout to receive 10% off (Use by 31st December)

Get In Touch

[email protected]

Instagram: @jackietann_rmt

ANGE FOSTER – How Heart Failure gave Ange a new lease on life … and a side hustle that supporting small businesses

ALEX HUTCHINSON – Redefining the limits of Human Performance

By | Podcast

Transcript:

Jackie
00:11
Hey, hey, this is Jackie Tann, and welcome to the body’s built better podcast. On the show, we chat with experts, athletes, coaches and authors to educate and inspire you. We explore the body’s incredible ability to heal, adapt, and evolve so you could crush limitations, reconnect your body and mind and discover your extraordinary potential.

Jackie
00:48
Today on the show, I chat with author and journalist Alex Hutchinson, Alex wrote the book: Endure Mind, Body and the Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance. This book has completely changed the way I think about training and what I’ve been thinking during training. He asked the question, what defines a person’s limits, fascinated by the extremes of human endurance testing, both physical and psychological limits?… [Listen to more on the Podcast]

Alex
02:22
Sure, well, first of all, thanks for having me on. And congratulations on saying that the title of the book without stumbling over it, that it curiously elastic limits human performance even if I stumble over it, and we’re trying to be made. You know, you executed it perfectly. So, congrats on that. And thank you for that. Yeah, so in terms of who I am. And, you know, while you’re talking to me, I guess I would describe my current position in the world as a I mean, I’m a journalist, but more specifically than that I’m a science journalist, and even more specifically than that I’m a Endurance Sports Science journalist, but just kind of a title that I made up for myself. And so my niche in the world is that I, I, I write for, for outside magazines, mostly these days, I’m a freelancer, but I do most of my writing for outside magazines. And I watched the scientific literature to do with a lot to do with endurance sports, I mean, more generally, also with health and and, you know, exercise and fitness and these sorts of areas, but but with a specific focus on endurance sports, and I try and understand what it is that scientists are learning about the way our bodies work and the way we can push our limits, and then try to translate that in a way because there’s this huge sort of firehose of scientific studies that are coming out all the time, but they’re not always accessible… [Listen to more on the Podcast!]

Jackie
06:14
Very much. And there’s so much in the book, it’s, it is quite mind blowing, really. So in the first chapter, you talk about John Landy, he basically declared that the four minute miles were beyond his capabilities, and then less than two months after Roger Bannister beat him to become the first man to break the four minute mile. He too breaks the four minute mile. Does it really come down to what we believe we’re capable of?

Alex
06:46
Yeah, so you’ll find people with strong opinions on this question. And I think anyone with a super strong opinion is, you know, in my humble opinion, wrong. It’s not all in your mind. But it’s not not in your mind. Your mind matters, too. And so, you know, this sort of Roger Bannister versus John Landy is one of the great debates of the ages. And one of the great sorts of questions is, what would John Landy have done if Roger Bannister didn’t exist? Because, you know, Bannister, I mean, Landy ran 3:57.9 or something like that, I think was 3:507.9 weeks after Bannister broke the four minute mile and he’d been running for like six times in a row. So on the surface, it’s like, he spent years running just over four minutes and then bam, as soon as Bannister does it, he does it. And he didn’t he did it again, too, you know, he wasn’t his only sub four minute mile. You can tell the story the other way too, though, because he’s all his four oh, twos. Were you know, low key meats in Australia and no disrespect to the level of competition in Australia in 1950. But it was he was running by himself and a lot of cases on windswept tracks, you know, and, you know, then he flew to Helsinki or justice to Finland rather, which was kind of the heart of the near the heart of European track and field at the time. The Finns in the early part of the 20th century were the dominant track country with Pavel Nermeen and a lot of other people so we finally got a chance to race against people close to his caliber. And sure enough, then he beat you so you can slice it a bunch of different ways. But to me, there’s no question that there was a mental barrier, and that once Bannister did it, other people set their sights because it wasn’t just Landy, you know, then a few You know, I think three or four other people did it within a year. And then pretty soon, it’s still not easy. And I say this is a guy who’s I was a 1500 meter runner a miler, basically, my best 1500 equates to a four flat point 02 for a mile. So, you know, that’s agonizing to me. And, and, you know, so I have to hugest respect for the four minute mile barrier. It’s, it’s, it’s enormous, but it’s no longer impossible. And I think part of that is thanks to knowing that someone else did it.

Jackie
09:04
Yeah. And I guess there’s being an athlete. Is it one of those things where you look at go Okay, well do the training, got the mindset now I got to compete against those of the same caliber.

Alex
09:23
For some people it is yeah, some people are gifted at doing it by themselves. You know, some, there’s a lot of different mindsets in the same way that some people need to be in a happy place to compete their best, some people need to be angry at something. Some people need the crowd. Some people find the crowd to be a real, you know, a barrier. They get too nervous so there’s everyone you know, optimal place is different. But in general, if we’re talking generalities, yeah, having someone to push you makes a huge, huge difference. And there’s amazing studies, or at least studies that I find I’d really fast anywhere, that they bring people into the lab and have them race their bicycle as fast as they can…[Listen to more on the Podcast]

Jackie
11:33
Yeah, absolutely incredible. will tell us about the studies that show how our performance is limited by our brains.

Alex
11:45
Yeah, well, that’s 300 pages of my book. Yeah, I mean, it’s, it’s, it’s yeah, exactly. It’s, it’s. I mean, there’s studies and there’s real world observations, too. So let me start with one of the sorts of smoking guns that led to this area of research. And just by way of background, what I would say is, you know, the 20th century was a huge leap productive time, in terms of understanding how the body works in the sense of the body as a machine, how do how do our lungs get oxygen to our muscles, how to our muscles, you know, use food, energy and all that. And so there was this vision, or this, this image of the body is just like a machine that we know, and if we know the components of the machine, we can figure out how fast or how far the machine can go. And it’s really since the late 90s, and early 2000s, that scientists have started more explicitly to try and incorporate the body and their understanding of the brain rather than their understanding of, of limits. And it’s, it’s an ongoing process. It’s still people. So lots of arguments. But one of the sort of observations in the late 90s and early 2000s, that was used to sort of argue, hey, this picture of the body as a machine is not sufficient, it doesn’t describe things is the fact that almost everybody sprints towards the finish of a race. So if you think of your body as just this machine for turning food energy into motion, the farther you go in the race, the more tired you are. And so if the fact that you’re slowed down is due to the fact that your body is limited, you should be slowing steadily throughout your race in the last part of the race, you should be as you know, as slow as you can go. And if you’re pushing to your limits, you should be going you should be basically making it to the finish line, hopefully, and then Keeling over, because you’re completely out of energy, you’re completely unable to get any more oxygen. But what we observe is the opposite, right? Like if you go to a local road race and stand near the finish line, you see everyone turn that final corner, see the finish line, and all of a sudden they’re high stepping as fast as they can go if they’re completely fresh. And my assumption was always that this is just a sign of inexperience, right. Like, these people didn’t pace themselves well. And if it was me, I didn’t pace myself. Well, when I get better, I will be able to run myself to the point that I’m pretty much out of energy. And I’m just sort of coasting across the finish line on fumes, because I’ve got all my energy… [Listen to more on the Podcast]

Where to find Alex:

Website: www.alexhutchinson.net 

Website: www.sweatscience.com

Twitter: @sweatscience

Get In Touch:

[email protected]

Instagram: @jackietann_rmt

DR SUE JACKSON – FLOW- the most incredible high performance state you’ll ever know

By | Podcast

Transcript

Jackie
00:11
Hey, hey, this is Jackie Tann, and welcome to the body’s built better podcast. On the show, we chat with experts, athletes, coaches and authors to educate and inspire you. We explore the body’s incredible ability to heal, adapt, and evolve so you could crush limitations, reconnect your body and mind and discover your extraordinary potential.

Jackie
00:47
Today on the show, I chat with Dr. Sue Jackson, a psychologist and expert in flow. She co-authored the book Flow in Sports: The Keys to Optimal Experiences and Performances with flow pioneer, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. I feel like anyone involved in sport needs to read this book. The other thing is, flow is not just limited to people playing in sport, you can experience flow in any type of activity. So if you can experience a sense of joy and engagement and focus and well flow, then why not practice getting into flow? Here’s a quote that I loved from the book.

Jackie
01:33
Once the keys to flow are understood, it becomes possible to transform the entirety of life from a stressful and chaotic chase into something resembling an enjoyable dance. I love that so much. And if that hasn’t convinced you to learn about flow and how to get into flow, then maybe this one will. Flow lifts experience from the ordinary to the optimal. And it is in those moments that we truly feel alive and in tune with what we are doing. And on that note, let’s get into flow with Dr. Sue Jackson. Sue, thank you so much for chatting with me today. I’m very excited to talk about flow. And if I’m honest, it’s actually a state or term that I only came across this year. And because of my love for sport, I came across your book Flow in Sports: The Keys to Optimal Experiences and Performances, which you co wrote with Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. I hope I said that right.

Dr. Sue
02:45
Well done, most people don’t get it right, first time.

Jackie
02:49
And I love the book. And I really I honestly think anyone who’s involved in sports and you know, wants to improve their performance and potential, I think it’s one that’s to be read. So I’m super excited. So thank you for joining me. And to kick this off. If you could give us some background on you and what led you to your work in flow?

Dr. Sue
03:12
Yeah, thanks, Jackie. It’s a pleasure to be on your podcast. And I hope that listeners will enjoy hearing about flow and that it will motivate them as it motivated you when you learned about it, to explore it more in their own lives. And my book Flow in Sports was obviously directed at athletes and coaches. And so for those listeners, flow is something that sport facilitates in many ways, although not always. And flow is also something that’s not just reserved for sports, so it can be experienced in any setting. It’s got relevance to all of us. And what led me to study flow, I did a combined psychology human women degree and I had a love of sport and was involved in teaching physical education and coaching sport to begin with, in Sydney where I’m from, and then I decided to take my interest in the mental side of sport into post grad degrees in sports psychology. And at the time, North America was and probably still remains a leading source of academic programs to train in. So I went across to the States. And I guess it was from doing that. And I was at the University of Illinois for my master’s degree.… [listen to more on the podcast]

Jackie
08:10
Yeah, that would have been so exciting, huh? So do tell what is flow, what is flow, we won’t keep it a secret.

Dr. Sue
08:21
Flow is a state of optimal focus on a task on the tasks that you’re doing at a particular time. And then beyond that complete concentration. It’s also associated with many other characteristics or qualities of experience. And the highlight is that we tend to really enjoy what we’re doing when we get absorbed in something in that we can let go of our worries and our self concerns. And it’s also associated with performing optimally. So it’s a state of total focus in which we feel at our best and we tend to perform at our best as well. Awesome. Yeah. And the most important, how do you experience flow for her? Yeah, well, that one, right. Yeah, we won’t need to spend much time on that. It’s good. It’s that’s the important question, of course, and it’s, it’s something that I can give some, some insights into. And, and I think that to, to really learn about how to experience flow would take someone committing some time and getting involved with some consulting with someone about their own situation and understanding that and what psychological skills would be most relevant to them, but there are some from research of the model of flow. There are, there are three preconditions, they’re called to flow. And so these things need to be in place for flow to be experienced. And the first is that there’s a balance between challenges and skills. And that if anyone wants to look up the model of flow, that is, that’s a four quadrant and the eight quadrant model of flow. And that’s where the title of the book Beyond Boredom and Anxiety comes from. So if you think of a four quadrant model, so if you just think of a vertical axis and a horizontal axis, you get four squares. And flow is one quadrant, anxiety is another quadrant, boredom is a quadrant and apathy is a quadrant. And so flow exists beyond the experiences of anxiety and boredom. And that is all defined by the relationship of challenges and skills to be in flow, you need to be in a challenging situation that you bring a high skill set to. So you need to have both challenges and skills high. So there’s two axes I talked about: the vertical axis is generally the challenge axis, from low to high. And then the skills axis is the horizontal axis that intersects it again, from low to high. So it’s when you’ve got both skills operating at a high level and a high level of challenge that flow can be experienced. Sometimes, if we look at opposite experiences, such as anxiety, which most of us can relate to, if we can’t yet relate to flow, or we can’t sort of pinpoint times who’ve been in flow, few of us would not be able to relate to times we’ve been anxious….[Listen to more on the podcast]

Jackie
12:32
So can beginners be, get into flow, if they’re, if they’re acquiring a skill?

Dr. Sue
12:42
it’s going to be a more challenging time to get into flow until you’ve got some base level of skill. However, the good thing, particularly in physical activity and sport settings is that we can generate as you would know, like you can generally modify a challenge. So as a PT, if you’re working with a client, that’s a non exerciser, or has an injury, that you modify, what you’re asking them to do, so that the level of challenge meets their skill set. So, it’s about getting that balance.

Listen to the complete interview on the Podcast!

Where to Find Dr Sue Jackson

Website: https://www.bodyandmindflow.com.au/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bodyandmindflow

Instagram: @suejackson_flow

Get in Touch

[email protected]

Instagram: @jackietann_rmt

INGRID NIELSEN- How exercise impacts “irreversible” diseases…

By | Podcast

Transcript

Jackie
00:11
Hey, hey, this is Jackie Tann and welcome to the body’s built better podcast. On the show we chat with experts, athletes, coaches and authors to educate and inspire you. We explore the body’s incredible ability to heal, adapt, and evolve so you could crush limitations, reconnect your body and mind and discover your extraordinary potential.

Jackie
00:46
Today on the show, I chat with psychiatrist, half marathon runner, and health and fitness advocate, Dr. Ingrid Nilsen. I’m so lucky to know Ingrid on a personal level, she has the most incredible story. Born in South Africa. She became a nun at 16 years of age. Five years later, quit being a nun. I don’t know if that’s the correct term, but she left nonetheless. She went on to study medicine, married an actor, divorced, said actor three kids later became a forensic pathologist. Eventually a psychiatrist moved to Australia. And if you were to see her face to face, no doubt, your first impression would be that of a lovely, sweet, old lady. Now, I know she would hate hearing me say that word old. Because at 73 She is still running half marathons. She trains several times a week, and is passionate about helping others understand that health and fitness is even more important in the later years of life. In fact, it’s necessary for an incredible woman to get ready to be inspired with Dr. Ingrid Nilsen. Ingrid, thank you so much for joining me today. We’ve known each other for a few years now. And you first came to me? Well, for some body maintenance, because you were doing a lot of training for a half marathon. And since then, we’ve got to know each other. And I think you’d have the most incredible story even if you don’t think so? I do. So can you give us a bit of background on you? right from the very beginning? Yeah.

Ingrid
02:41
Thank you, Jackie, for asking me. And yes, we’ve had a great relationship over the years who have kept this old body. reasonable, Nick, I think over the years, we’ve known each other, um, yeah, from the beginning, or at the beginning 73 years ago. That’s how old I am now. And just to summarize, born in South Africa, one of three siblings, parents, my mother had actually been orphaned at the age of three. And so she was brought up in a Catholic orphanage, this might become relevant later. And so I think she had all the understandable limitations of a child brought up without much emotional support and touching and affection and that sort of thing. And my father was a great provider in terms of finances and so on. But he was a pretty hard old bloke with a very strong emphasis on work, huge emphasis on Work and Income, and less so on other things. Having said that, we had a perfectly adequate childhood. Parents cared for us, and said, there were no dramas there at all. I ended up becoming a rather shy and anxious teenager. Part of this, I think, was great growing up with parents with a background that they had…[Listen to more on the Podcast]

Jackie
06:52
And how did you go from forensic pathology to psychiatry?

Ingrid
06:57
My work with hospice and I love talking to people. So this little shy, quiet, introverted, 16 year old had become somebody who really liked talking to people. And you get people at their most draw, and their most honest, when their life is very limited. And I really enjoyed those encounters. And I think this took me generally in the direction of studying the QRP. So I walked away from forensic pathology, and then did my training as a psychiatrist, still in school in South Africa. At that time. I made the move, I and my three then quite young children made the move to Australia in 91. And I can talk to you about why that happened. And family issues if you’d like.

Jackie
07:50
Oh, yes, because this is even more fascinating.

Ingrid
07:55
These do. All right. So I’m married, a very well known not well known in Australia, but very well known in South Africa, actor and film director. When I was 30. He had been married twice before. And yes, I can see the smiles, you know, didn’t you think about that? Didn’t you ask why. But at that stage, remembering my history I had been in the convent for five years, I had come out. And that’s been seven years studying when it was really head down and Bama up and did nothing else. And then I met this guy, and you know, the rest is history. Anyway, we married and had three children within quite a short space of time. And when the children were one, two and four, he decided he preferred somebody else. So he left me with his three children, and has subsequently gone on to wife number four, five and six. He had no contact with his children. And sadly for him, he’s now deceased. He died last year…[listen to more on the podcast]

Jackie
13:00
Keep it going?

Ingrid
13:03
Okay, so it’s, I guess, to the point where Yeah, you came to Adelaide? Yep. And started your private practice. Yeah, I was in private practice in Adelaide, in Chicago as a private psychiatrist for 20 years. So. And clearly, I saw a certain sort of subgroup of patients as you’re doing private practice that was a hard time in a different sort of way. I work really hard. I still had three children to educate and support. So it was hard. I worked hard. I think I work too hard. My hours were too long. And I think I told myself the story that that’s the way it had to be. Again, with the wisdom of hindsight, I think it didn’t really have to be that way. I could have done things a little bit differently and stepped back a little and took better care of myself possibly. During that 20 year period, about probably about halfway through. And I was finding it really difficult. I was still practicing, I believe. But as when people get depressed, I think it just becomes harder and harder and harder to do things. And a lot of people I’m sure will relate to this, that when things get tough. We tend to let up personal things go and sometimes we let our family relationships go. But work tends to be the thing that we hold on to the longest. And so it was on one occasion, I can still remember the date it was the eighth of October 2003…

Listen to the complete interview on the Podcast!

CRAIG HARPER – Calling BS on the stories You tell yourself

By | Podcast

Transcript

Jackie
00:10
Hey, hey, this is Jackie Tann and welcome to the buddy’s built better podcast. On the show we chat with experts, athletes, coaches and authors to educate and inspire you. We explore the body’s incredible ability to heal, adapt, and evolve so you could crush limitations, reconnect your body and mind and discover your extraordinary potential.

Jackie
00:42
Today on the show, I chatted with exercise scientist and one of Australia’s leading presenters, writer and educator in the areas of health, high performance, resilience, self management, stress management, addiction and personal transformation, Craig Harper. As an exercise scientist, he has worked with many professional athletes and teams, including St Kilda, football club, Melbourne, vixens, Nolan Phoenix, and a long list of Olympians and world class athletes in a broad range of sports. He’s a straight shooter with a wicked sense of humor. And if you’re easily offended by profanities, then this is probably not the episode for you. There is more than the occasional F word in this episode, but it doesn’t come without the educational or motivational wake up call that we all need. We dig into the psychology of fear, success, overcoming challenges, building resilience, what is self awareness, and how to unlearn the habits that are hardwired into us. I had so much fun chatting with Craig, this episode has it all. And the swear words. Have fun. listening in to Craig Harper. Craig, thank you so much for joining me today. For those who don’t know who you are. Can you give us a spiel, a little background on you?

Craig
02:12
Oh, really? Well. I’m Bogan Melbourne. Anything else?

Jackie
02:17
Great. Perfect.

Craig
02:18
All right. I’m g hamal. So there’s a lot of stuff I’ll give you the dot point so

Jackie
02:26
30 seconds worth.
Craig
02:27
Alright grew up in the tri Valley rural Victoria fat kid. Heaps of issues insecure overthinking all that stuff. Got fit got in shape started working in fitness. Ran gyms owned multiple gyms did a degree in exercise science became a university lecturer wrote a few books a bunch of books in fact, I think I owe nine what else started doing corporate speaking when I was 26, which was 30 years ago. do lots of that. So lots of corporate speaking lots of working with teams and athletes bunch of Olympians I feel clubs, National League netball clubs listen motorsport so in the debates What else? Yeah employed out of 500 trainers right the first PT course set up the first Personal Training Center in Australia. I’m currently doing a PhD in neuropsychology. And I’m fascinated with human beings. I love humans and I love human behavior and I love all that the multi dimensional miss that is asked the psychology emotion physiology relationships, communication connection, the peaks troughs, the pleasure the pain, the joy, the drama, the euphoria, all that shit that makes us humans tick and work and fascinating. That’s what draws me in

Jackie
03:52
That’s sensational. I think I’ve learned more about 30 seconds and I did the last two weeks binge watching your stuff. You so you’ve worked with obviously incredible people and high performers. I’m fascinated with high performance as well and I really want to start this combo around fear, our fear of failure and insecurities and you know, not being good enough and rejection and judgment. How, how do we recognize that as either ego or something that we’ve learnt growing up?

Craig
04:36
Where you’re only giving me two options? That’s very manipulative of you.

Jackie
04:39
Okay, how many more options are there?

Craig
04:43
I’m only kidding. I’m kidding. So I’m just messing with you. So I mean fee is fees, unavoidable fees and ever present reality of being human? I’m still scared of stuff. I still have fear. I still have ego, I still have bullshit. Still insecure. I still overthink, I still want approval. I still do dumb stuff and good stuff, right? This challenge for us is not perfection. The challenge is, if we’re in this space of wanting to learn and grow and evolve, that challenges improvement, and growth and understanding and insight and, and, you know, courage is not the absence of fear, courage is doing what’s required to get where you want to go or live your values or live your truth or your purpose while being scared. And that’s how you get less scared is by stepping into the fear. Like, we can’t get good at the thing that we don’t do. So, when I first started corporate speaking, I was terrible. A year later, I was slightly less terrible…

Listen to the rest of the interview on the Podcast!

Where to find Craig:

Website: https://www.craigharper.net/

Podcast – The You Project: https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/the-you-project/id1342430567

Instagram: @whiteboardlessons

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CraigHarperOfficial

Get In Touch

[email protected]

Instagram: @jackietann_rmt

GABRIELLE NANKIVELL – Searching for your identity in a global pandemic

By | Podcast

Transcript

Jackie
00:11
Hey, hey, this is Jackie Tann and welcome to the body’s built better podcast. On the show we chat with experts, athletes, coaches and authors to educate and inspire you. We explore the body’s incredible ability to heal, adapt, and evolve so you could crush limitations, reconnect your body and mind and discover your extraordinary potential.

Jackie
00:44
Today on the show, I chatted with dancer, choreographer and director Gabrielle Nankivell. Her work has been widely presented across Australia and all over Europe and Asia. One of our commissioned pieces back in 2018, was a piece called surge to dance in Australia. And it was performed at the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games and was described as thrilling in the way it combines the energy of sport and the beauty of dance. She’s been nominated for several awards, including the Helpmann Award for Best Choreography in ballet dance, or physical theater production. And the Adelaide Critics Circle individual award for a split second of heroes. In 2020, she’s developing a piece of code for future history, a solo born from her 2019 Arts, South Australia fellowship, research and sightings, a site specific performance making model in collaboration with Vital Statistics. And if you thought that would be easy, she’s doing that whilst recovering from injury, her first major injury and surgery in her 20 plus year dancing career. She’s incredibly wise and down to earth. And as she’s navigating 2020, she was kind enough to chat with me today, a raw and real interview of what it’s like to be a performer today, enjoy this episode with Gabrielle Nankivell. Gabrielle, thank you so much for chatting with me today. I’m super excited to chat. Because growing up, I did a little bit of dance. And obviously now I work with a lot of performers. And I know how hard you guys work. And I have so much respect for you in the industry. But before we get into that, can you give us a bit of background on you and when and where it all started?

Gabrielle
02:48
Sure. Yeah. Hi. This is actually really nice. This is nice to do, because I know you in a really different context, because, you know, you’ve given me some amazing messages. So it’s nice to have a chat. That’s nice. Um, yeah, I work in dance. And that’s a fairly diverse sort of field. I have worked in lots of different kinds of dance, but primarily I work in contemporary dance. So I trained, I trained as a ballet dancer, and my first job was a ballet job. But generally since then, most things I’ve done would fall under the category of contemporary dance. As the choreographer and a director, I work in contemporary dance, but also in theater, and sometimes in film. And I guess I do a lot of collaborative projects that involve lots of different kinds of artists. So I guess from some, from some side, more, the area that I work in is like conceptualizing ideas and then working with a bunch of people to realize it. So sometimes, yeah, how to categorize what the actual outcome is, is a little more tricky. Yeah, but I had very conventional training. So, I trained in classical ballet, and I went to a full time ballet school. And I then went to University where I did a dance course. But this was also in the 90s. And dance courses have evolved a lot since then…[listen to more on the podcast]

Jackie
06:16
The must have been a huge eye opener. What challenges came with that?

Gabrielle
06:24
Well, it’s kind of interesting, because I think I think one of the things that retrospectively was really beautiful about going to a place that I didn’t have a very good idea of, and didn’t have much information on. And sort of fumbling around in the dark, trying to figure it out meant that actually, like there’s a certain kind of naivety that comes with that. And also, yeah, like a sort of openness and a curiosity. And your awareness is just kind of different in having that experience. And I feel like that, for me is something that’s been really instrumental in the attitude I have towards my work, sort of, since then it kind of like built something into me, that’s about how I work creatively. And I feel like now, the world has changed so much in the last 20 years, that that’s something that I kind of feel like that certain particular kind of naivety, that comes with the world not being as, as open and accessible as it is now that people miss out on like, it’s like, you know, with all the social media and everything we have you, even if you’re going on a holiday, like you can research it, and you can see 1000 pictures, and there’s like, you know, a gazillion posts on Instagram of like the view from this place, or whatever. So you already have a real clear, somewhat clear kind of aesthetic idea maybe of where you’re going. Or if you’re a dancer in Australia, and you, you know, you’ve looked at 10 billion videos of European dance companies and artists and you sort of, you know, what you like, you know, what you want to maybe go and try? And do you want to know, where, and in some ways that’s really great, because it’s, you know, it’s economical, you can plan you can like, be more strategic. But there’s something about the like, the super unknown that I feel that we’ve lost over time. That’s something that when I was first doing that, I feel like it was really yeah, like, left a really big impression on how I am, yeah, and more purity to that, as it’s different. I mean, I don’t I don’t know that either one is better, I just kind of retrospectively really appreciate the sort of the experience I had of the unknown. And that’s an experience that I feel is very different for people these days. Do you think as students now, as performers can take that a little bit for granted? With the amount of access that they do have, I guess, to,

Jackie
08:57
I guess, the outside world of university or training?

Gabrielle
09:01
Yeah, I don’t know. It’s, it’s hard to say because it’s just so it’s, it sort of depends on the person, like some people really, you know, they really look and they discover, so it’s sort of like maybe, maybe, in that there’s a sense of discovery and finding out the unknown, but you do it from one place looking through a screen through like that sort of, you know, that’s the mode rather than going out and wandering around. Yeah. So some people will naturally seek and they will look, they will look for stuff that they find inspiring and they’ll spend lots of time kind of Yeah, investigating and then other people even though that’s at their disposal, they they won’t or they’ll see one thing they like and they’ll set their mind on that and, you know, and go for that, but I guess yeah, I don’t know. It’s also I think sometimes the way you know what we put into what goes on to the internet goes out into the world via social media is such a, it’s such a curated thing. Also, you know, people really, if they show what they want to show, and they don’t show all the other kinds of things. So also sometimes I think this leads perhaps to like, a, a particular kind of reality for someone who’s looking for something, they see something, and they understand it as this because that’s all they’re shown, but maybe it’s actually different. And that’s the thing you still can’t do without actually going and being, you know, in that, but, yeah, so I don’t really know, to go back to question I don’t know, we’ll take, you know, like, a beat sort of. Yeah, it’s Yeah, that’s, that’s a really, that’s a really hard one, because I think it’s up to the individual as to how, how much they take advantage of that or don’t.

Jackie
10:53
Is there an experience of, of that time for you. That’s kind of a memorable one for you to go off. If it weren’t for that I wouldn’t have, you know, done this or think this way or, you know, evolved in this way?

Gabrielle
11:12
Or there’s probably a lot. Yeah.

Jackie
11:17
That’s really cool. Yeah.

Gabrielle
11:21
This, I think, I feel like there’s probably a few like, um, you know, if I hadn’t, I kind of flew, when I booked my ticket for the first time, you know, I flew on a plane from Australia, to Frankfurt. And the reason that I flew to Frankfurt was because that was one of the cheapest places to fly to. It’s also like, I knew a company there called the Frankfurt ballet, which was directed by William Forsyth. And this was something that was part of my, you know, education. I sort of vaguely knew about this. So I knew that there was dance in Germany, and that there was dance in Frankfurt. So it seemed a logical kind of entry point to go to, but in the end, you know, like, I didn’t actually, I didn’t go anywhere near that company, because I was also like, oh, but they’re so big…

Listen to the complete interview on the Podcast!

Where to find Gabrielle:

Instagram: @gabnank

Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/user10138491

Bespoke: Interview and insight to Gabrielle’s Choreographic work Bespoke

A Thing Of Hair and Skin

Get in Touch

[email protected]

Instagram: @jackietann_rmt

ESTHER GOLDSMITH – Improving performance and recovery by tracking your menstrual cycle

By | Podcast

Transcript

Jackie
00:11
Hey, hey, this is Jackie Tann and welcome to the body’s built better podcast. On the show we chat with experts, athletes, coaches and authors to educate and inspire you. We explore the body’s incredible ability to heal, adapt, and evolve so you could crush limitations, reconnect your body and mind and discover your extraordinary potential.

Jackie
00:44
Today on the show, I am super excited to be chatting with sports and exercise physiologist, Esther Goldsmith. Esther is part of the science team at Fitrwoman and Orreco when they are performing incredible research in female physiology, and how to optimize athletic performance by tracking and understanding your menstrual cycle. This is groundbreaking research, I am so excited for the future of women’s sports. But not only that, on a personal note, I have a much better understanding what’s happening in my body. Did you know ladies, we have four phases of our cycle. And in each cycle, we have different physiological symptoms. Or we could be doing different things in our training in our recovery and on nutrition. Whether you’re an athlete coach, or a woman just trying to understand your symptoms, and how you can manage your well being This is for you. Enjoy this episode with Esther Goldsmith, Esther, thank you so much for chatting with me today. I’m super excited to be talking about the incredible work that you’re doing around the menstrual cycle. But before we get into it, I’d love for you to tell us more about you.

Esther
02:03
Yeah, sure. Well, firstly, thank you for having me. And it’s an absolute honor. And so I am a researcher, exercise, Sport and Exercise Physiologist. And I work for a company called Orreco. And we have a female athlete program and that centered around our app Fitrwoman…[listen to more on the podcast]

Jackie
03:32
That’s so amazing. And you said it perfectly. I think we’re all in that same sort of boat, like, you know, where we don’t know so much about our own bodies. And if we did, how much more we could get out of ourselves and out of our training or whatever it is. And so it’s super exciting the work that you’re doing. And let’s let’s go back to basics, what are some? Firstly, some common misconceptions and myths around the menstrual cycle?

Esther
04:03
Sure, I was always thinking about this. And I think the first one and probably I hope things are changing about it. But I guess a really common one is that I can’t exercise when I’m on my period like it’s, it’s everywhere. People just like Oh, don’t Don’t worry, like it’s fine or, and fair enough. Like some people are in debilitating pain like that. I mean, that shouldn’t be happening. But if you can’t get out of bed, then probably exercising is probably the last thing you want to be doing. But we know that and like we should research has actually shown that aerobic exercise and yoga are really beneficial and to manage symptoms. So actually exercise whilst you’re on your period is probably one of the best things you can do. And again, like it’s not, I do remember someone telling me about it. seismics perhaps you’re better. But once you’re in pain, I get that that’s not gonna work….[listen to more on the podcast]

Jackie
06:06
Yeah, absolutely. Why do you think it’s only now that we’re starting to see this research in female athletes? And how do you go about the research? Because, obviously, there are so many variables for

Esther
06:24
Yeah it’s not easy. I did my dissertation research on the menstrual cycle and running in front of me. And like, even that was difficult. And I, I would, I would change how I did it now. Like, no, I know so much more. So I think well, so there’s been a historical lack of reset. And that was partly because pre World War Two women were deemed as protected subjects, that women weren’t allowed to participate in medical research. And that was partly to protect unborn fetuses. And then as kind of research was established, then, unfortunately, those were the kinds of things that fit into my scandal. So that almost made me more worried about testing women…[listen to more on the podcast]

Jackie
09:24
I’m really interested. You said so you did a dissertation around the running economy. Yeah. And then you said, If you knew what you knew, now, you do it a bit differently. Yeah, what?

Esther
09:41
I don’t know if I should say it because we published, our publication. And so my methodology was, and I tested the women every week, and that was pretty much on a fixed day. It was the same day for four weeks. And it was what I had with no budget is what I had to do with no budget and no access, like no immediate access to a lab, I had to book labs all the time. There is now kind of rigorous methodology would be to kind of observe the participants menstrual cycles, kind of one cycle two cycles before you start testing, see like their, like, what their typical cycle is like, give them some Lh kits, make sure that over regulating, and then get Lh kits for the testing process as well, which is what I couldn’t afford, unfortunately, as a student, and, and then so then you can kind of detect when just before ovulation is going to happen, because that’s when estrogen is at its peak. So you want to, you want to measure like lofi. So you want to make sure like low fees, and we’ll probably get into this in a second. And when hormones are low, then you want an estrogen peak. And then after that you want progesterone being high and then you want the premaster to clock in. So there aren’t particular hormone phases that you can get if you’ve got someone who is that amazing 28 day cycle, absolutely textbook, then you can do it by counting. But who actually is that? So?

Listen to the complete interview on our Podcast!

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Orreco Website: https://www.orreco.com/

Ted Talk: https://www.ted.com/talks/alyson_mcgregor_why_medicine_often_has_dangerous_side_effects_for_women/footnotes

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RYAN HURST – How can we train to be better in what ever it is, we want to do?

By | Podcast

Transcript

Jackie
00:11
Hey, hey, this is Jackie Tann and welcome to the body’s built better podcast. On the show we chat with experts, athletes, coaches and authors to educate and inspire you. We explore the body’s incredible ability to heal, adapt, and evolve so you could crush limitations, reconnect your body and mind and discover your extraordinary potential.

Jackie
00:44
Today on the show, I chatted with co founder of GMB Fitness, Ryan Hurst. Now, I came across Ryan’s work and GMB, probably six years ago now. And the reason I love his work is because he encourages you to move and really explore your body and its capabilities in a way that is different from your typical gym program or group class. Our bodies are incredible in the way we can move and adapt. And his work is not just about building strength, but body awareness, spatial awareness, balance and stability, efficiency and mindfulness and the exploration of movement, which I love. And, you know, I think we put some so much pressure on ourselves to achieve these, you know, heavy lifts or running a PB or we look over to the person next to us doing the exercise or the movement, whatever it is, and we forget that moving for movement sake from physical health, mental health, emotional health, far outweighs any arbitrary number on a machine or the weight plate or the scales.

Jackie
01:58
But, look, don’t get me wrong. I’m not saying that you can’t have those goals. All I’m saying is that sometimes we forget that exercise and movement, and the exploration of that movement offers so much more to our health than just constantly looking at the numbers. So, this was a really fun chat, and I’ll know you love it. So please enjoy this episode with Ryan Hurst. Ryan, thank you so much for joining. Can you give a bit of background on you and how GMB Fitness eventually came about? Sure.

Ryan
02:38
Yeah. I’m gonna try and keep it quick. There’s a lot there. We’re actually coming up. Next month is going to be our 10 year anniversary, which is kind of crazy. Thank you very much. That’s officially like when we kind of put it on paper. It started a couple years before that. But anyway, yeah. So my background, I’m originally from the United States, in a place called Wichita, Kansas. Growing up, competitive gymnast. I did that until I was 18. And I also did martial arts at same time, pretty busy, pretty busy boy growing up. Movement oriented things have always been my thing. I’ve just always been interested in that way to uni in the United States. blew up my knee, by the way. So when I was 18, I had a major knee injury in gymnastics. And so I didn’t continue with gymnastics. I actually did continue with martial arts. And in uni though, they had a Japanese class. It was the first time they were offering Japanese. My Japanese teacher, fabulous, fabulous lady. Her and my martial art instructor sparked the interest in wanting to visit Japan. There were no opportunities at my university. However, my teacher reached out to a teacher at another university. I ended up getting a scholarship to go study at a uni over here. I was only supposed to be there for like six months. I went over to study martial arts…[Listen to more on the podcast]

Jackie
10:27
Take a sip. Um, all right. Well, you said you had a knee injury. Now was that? Was that the reason having stopped gymnastics?

Ryan
10:38
You know, I gotta be honest, I think I was burnt out in gymnastics by that point. From age, I say like six, you know, years old. That’s what you know, maybe there’s a little after that. But basically, when I was small, that’s all I did, like, every single day, until I was 18. traveling all over to compete from state to state. You know, my parents were amazing that they put up with that and supported me when I was doing that. ButI think I just kind of got to a point where I was looking at other things. And I think that I actually didn’t get the injury in gymnastics. I got it in martial arts. Yeah, and so that kind of just solidified everything. And I just graduated from high school, secondary school, I guess you guys say, is that correct? Um, and I got this injury, and I had to get surgery. And I ended up my first semester of uni, in this big knee brace. And it was, it wasn’t good. So anyway, yeah. I think that it was actually good that I stopped. I was thinking of going to uni with gymnastics, but ended up not doing that. And the entry was a big thing with that.

Jackie
12:01
So what sort of impact did gymnastics have? In your life? Obviously, it’s a big part of your life. Physically, mentally, emotionally? Sure.

Ryan
12:13
Yeah. It was my life. I think the biggest impact of besides like, the particular skills, and was really my coach, I gotta be honest. Thanks to Mark Folger. Yeah, it’s pretty funny. Um, we’re still in contact today. Um, he played a huge part in not only what I do today, but in how I do things. The way that he taught on things that I didn’t even realize until I started doing GMB that were coming out, thanks to him. Good example would be the way that I look at skills. I know a GMB, we look at practicing skills. And this isn’t me being cocky, okay? Not at all. It’s just simply the way that I look at things is, if there’s a particular skill that I want to do, there’s never a doubt in my mind that I won’t get it. And the reason why is, Mark was always like, don’t focus on getting the skill, focus on the things that are right in front of you, and just keep practicing those things, that skill will naturally happen. And so to me, that was huge…[listen to more on the podcast]

Jackie
17:54
Yeah, so what do you think of the methodologies and philosophies of GMB now that carried on from all of your experience?

Ryan
18:04
Absolutely. So we have what we call the five PS. It’s funny, because this is how I mean, when we explain to people that are like, yeah. It’s one of those things where, until you really sit down and you explain it, you put it out there, it’s just kind of like, Oh, you know, um, the way that we trained in martial arts the same way and we just took that, organize it in a way that would be applicable to what we’re doing. And the thing about GMB is that, to be honest, it’s not about the skills I talked about the skills. It’s not about a particular movement. So it’s, it’s, we’re not the handstand guys, we’re not the local motion people. Really, up until now, that’s what you see….

Listen to the complete interview on the podcast

Where to find Ryan and GMB Fitness:

Website: www.gmb.io

Instagram: @ryhurst and @gmbfitness

You Tube: GMB Fitness

Get in touch:

[email protected]

Instagram: @jackietann_rmt